Falling for the Highlander (Lynsay Sands)

Falling for the Highlander - Lynsay Sands
Category:
Author:
Publisher:
Published: 1/31/2017
Lady Murine Carmichael has known her share of bad luck. But when her debt-ridden half-brother tries to sell her off in exchange for a few Scottish horses, it’s the final straw. If keeping her freedom means escaping through harsh countryside alone, so be it. She has barely begun her journey when she lands an unlikely escort—the brawny Highlander who just refused to buy her virtue. Dougall Buchanan was disgusted by Lord Danvries’ shameful offer, but…

Overall Response

So this reread was a little less satisfying than I remember. I liked this book a lot the first time I read it, but this probably the second or third time, and I wasn't as charmed by the things I liked the first time. I was looking forward to Murine's book because she was a bit of an atypical character. She had a penchant for fainting when we met her in To Marry a Scottish Laird, so I wanted to see how Lynsay Sands would write her HEA. I still really like Murine, even though I think her fainting spells were a bit oddly handled. Did she faint too much because she didn't eat? Or didn't have the tincture? I don't know. I just don't feel like it was that clear.

And Dougall doesn't really do anything to make himself separate from his other brothers or give me a reason I should want him for Murine above anyone else. That's kind of my problem with some of the heroes in this series -- apart from Ross in An English Bride and Aulay in The Highlander's Promise, the heroes are kind of the same. The plot is fine -- it doesn't drag nearly as much as the last book, but I thought the book ended a little abruptly.

Spoilers Ahead

So Dougall was kind of a major disappointment in this book for me, and he kind of pushed some boundaries on consent that made me uncomfortable. There were scenes when Murine was drunk and he kissed her and nearly seduced her. He stops himself short of actually having sex with her, but that still doesn't really make it work for me. And then he does that thing I hate in my romances. He abruptly starts to ignore Murine so he can keep himself under control--but doesn't tell Murine so she's left to think he thinks she's some kind of whore.

First, I hate when heroes do this and then heroines blame themselves. It's a lazy writing trope, but whatever. It's common. But I really really have grown to hate the excuse that Dougall can't control himself. Murine can't ride on his horse, because he might seduce her. Murine can't even talk to him because he might seduce her. How weak are you, dude?

One of Dougall's brothers had to actually caution him against treating Murine like a lightskirt, but Dougall went ahead and did it anyway. I can't remember which brother it was (they're all the same) but I want him for Murine since he clearly has a head on his shoulders.

Murine is great. She's the saving grace in this book. She's resourceful, brave, funny, and vulnerable. I just wanted her to have a better hero.

2.3Overall Score

Falling for the Highlander

Overall Response So this reread was a little less satisfying than I remember. I liked this book a lot the first time I read it, but this probably the second or third time, and I wasn’t as ...

  • Plot
    3
  • Characters
    3
  • Romance
    1

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.