The Courtship by Grace Burrowes

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The first novella to be published by author Grace Burrowes features the foundation story for her Windham series. This is the tender story of love tested and won, and how Percy Windham, the dashing and brilliant man who was never supposed to become the Duke of Moreland, wooed the amazing lady who became his beloved Duchess. Percival Windham is a second son, and a cavalry officer acclaimed and respected by his men. He is immensely…

Overall

Novellas are rarely my cup of tea. I’m not a huge fan of the short romances because, ninety percent of the time, the author not only writes the romance but also tries to fit in a subplot with a mystery or an external villain trying to play as an antagonist. That’s a lot to ask of a shorter story, particularly if the two leads have not yet met. Something always gets short-changed.

In this case, I also remember that I didn’t read The Courtship when it was released because I simply wasn’t overly interested in the relationship between Percy and Esther, the parents of the eight Windham siblings. Then, Grace Burrowes released The Duke and His Duchess which sought to provide back story as to how Their Graces came to raise Percy’s two illegitimate children alongside their legitimate ones. I wanted to read that story, so I kind of felt obligated to read the first novella. I’m glad I did.

Percival Windham, the spare to the Moreland duchy, has been dispatched to a house party along with his younger brother, Anthony, in order to secure a bride. Their mother is worried that their ill elder brother, the heir, will die from a lingering illness without siring a son, leaving the duchy’s future in doubt. Once there, Percy meets Esther Himmelfarb, no-nonsense spinster who does not expect to marry due to her lineage and lack of dowry.

I’m glad I read it in 2014 and even happier to find on my reread that I like it as much I did the first time. Burrowes eschews a larger external narrative, preferring to make Esther and Percy’s romance the entire focus. We have some minor deviations in switching to the POV of either Percy’s father or Sir Jasper, the rake who tries to importune Esther, but overall this is a very good attempt to flesh out the supporting characters of Percy and Esther. Percy in particular benefits from this deeper look into his past as he has, at times, played the antagonist in his children’s books, so I appreciate getting to know him more outside the POV of his children.

This is a really sweet story and a good introduction to the world that Burrowes begins with the stories that not only unfold with the Windham children but the larger world of family and friends.

Spoilers

I don’t have a lot to say here. I guess I think maybe the Duchess of Moreland could have had a POV to better draw out her character but she wasn’t really that important. All of the small obstacles that Burrowes placed it front of Percy and Esther are easily batted away, which would bother me in a longer romance. It works in a novella.

I liked that Percy never saw Esther as plain and was drawn to her quiet serenity. This is definitely influenced by the fact that I’ve read the extended universe and therefore, I recognize that it’s something he continues to value in Esther as they grow old together. I thought their romance was built nicely—the quiet confidences and honesty they shared, the sweetness in his proposal.

It’s a good book, and I’m looking forward to continuing my journey in this world.

4.2Overall Score

Overall Novellas are rarely my cup of tea. I’m not a huge fan of the short romances because, ninety percent of the time, the author not only writes the romance but also tries to fit in a subplot ...

  • Plot
    3.0
  • Characters
    4.5
  • Romance
    5.0

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